Monday, March 25, 2019

The New and Improved Bond Mortgage Swoop

The New and Improved Bond Mortgage Swoop
Last week, we dreamed up the idea of our mortgage swoop, where we'd pay off our mortgage all at once as soon as our financial independence fund got to $1M plus our mortgage balance. The feedback from readers was a little...mixed. With few in outright support of the swoop, I think the general consensus was that even if the plan isn't optimal by the numbers, it is at least simple, straightforward, and good in the sense that being without a mortgage in early retirement can be a pretty good thing on its own.

Then I tweeted out to Big ERN as well as Joe & OG from Stacking Benjamins, just to get the take from some people who know more about analyzing financial options than I do. Instead of just giving his opinion on the swoop, Big ERN threw out an entirely different idea, too.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Our Mortgage Swoop

Our Mortgage Swoop
Ever since we purchased our first home, Mrs. Done by Forty and I have had no idea what to do with our mortgage. When we first got in to personal finance we were against debt of any sort, so we threw every dime we could at our first mortgage, paying it off in just over three years.

Seeing how we did this from 2010-2013, this plan had opportunity costs that are so large that it hurts my heart to even think about it. Still, it felt good at the time.

After paying off the house and enjoying debt-free bliss for a year, we up and bought a couple adorable rental properties, complete with tiny mortgages.

After a while, we realized that opportunity costs are just as real as any other cost. So we took out another mortgage on our primary residence in 2016, just three years after paying it off. I always wished I'd called in to Dave Ramsey's show to tell him that.

Now, nine years after buying our first home, both of the rentals and our first primary residence are long gone, as are our dreams of lording over a real estate empire. It turns out we hate being landlords.

Do we hate mortgages, too? Let's find out, because we're about to pivot on our mortgage once again.

Monday, March 11, 2019

Who Wants a Fight With No Referee?

Since we need to have a fresh injustice each day, the Trump administration is rolling back protections on the payday loan industry, because of course they are.

I don't know why I am still and continually surprised by this administration, but I am.

Why wouldn't they take a look at a situation that has the low-earning, underbanked on one side, and a well-financed predatory lending industry on the other and decide, "You know what? I think we need to take the kid gloves off these lenders. Let's see what the unfettered free market does when they don't have to consider whether borrowers can actually repay loans at 400% interest. The financial crisis was ages ago, anyway."

The good people at MSNBC have a video that explains the situation in an excellent segment titled "Money, Power, Politics".

For a deeper dive, check out this NYT piece that outlines how the one federal agency tasked with protecting consumers has instead put the interests of payday lenders first.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Hitting a Moving Target

Hitting a Moving Target
It is weird to think that this blog is over six years old now. Back when I was starting out in 2012, I was only 32, had only recently started getting interested in financial independence and early retirement, and with the fervor of the newly converted, thought I should be able to knock out that goal in eight years.

Mrs. Done by Forty and I were newly married and still didn't know whether we wanted kids in the near future, or at all. We were living in our first house, a true fixer that was originally a two bedroom, one bath with odd additions for the third bedroom and second bath. We were renting out a room to help pay the tiny, $104,000 mortgage. Looking back at our old budgets, we were frugal. Our annual spending barely tipped over $30k, after we had the mortgage paid off.

I figured retiring by forty would be pretty achievable.

But a lot's changed over the past six years. 

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Work Optional: Rebranding FIRE

Inspiring, thoughtful, and detailed to the point of wondering if a book can be too well researched, Tanja Hester's Work Optional examines financial independence and early retirement with a scope that sets the book apart. This easy read can surely introduce "FIRE" to a newcomer, while forcing long-time enthusiasts to question how well they've really thought their early retirement plans through.

Engaging and thought-provoking throughout (no small feat considering most people will get up and walk out of a room to avoid a discussion about money), Work Optional deserves a spot beside A Simple Path to Wealth: the two books you should share with a friend or coworker asking what this whole financial independence thing is about.

Hester manages to balance the small-but-necessary details (for example, have you, thirty-something early retirement enthusiast, budgeted for the fact that Medicare will only cover 60% of your medical expenses thirty years from now?) with the motivating, why-are-we-doing-this big picture items. (What kind of life do you want to live? What does your ideal day actually look like?)

Monday, February 4, 2019

The Wage Gap, & Sharing Salary with Women

The Wage Gap & Sharing Salary with Women Coworkers
Source
"We are labor. They are management," Ang, my coworker friend from the other side of our cubicle wall, reminded me.

"I know. But I'm new."

Without me realizing it, as a 21 year old employee who knew nothing about anything, Ang was mentoring me, as well as advocating for me to be reclassified. I was technically doing the work of a buyer, while being paid as an administrative assistant. 

If she was right, I'd be reclassified into a new role with a higher salary. But submitting formally for a reclassification was tricky: we had to involve the union, human resources, my own boss. And it might not work, which could be a career limiting move. Would my boss view it as a slap in the face?

Monday, January 14, 2019

College Plan? Undeclared.

Two days after Christmas, we closed on the sale of our second, and final, rental property. We got a full price offer, too. (Minus having to give the buyers a $2k credit towards closing).

It is hard to describe how good this feels.

Though I was a bit nervous right up until the day the check cleared. A previous buyer on this property backed out at the last second, even after we agreed to fix the major items in his inspection list. So I wasn't going to declare we were officially-and-forever out of the rental business until the papers were signed.

Monday, November 26, 2018

40 Thousand to Freedom

There's a question that gets thrown around in the FIRE community: is achieving financial independence and early retirement possible for everyone? And I keep getting surprised that the correct answer is hardly ever uttered. I'm not sure I've heard it more than once. Which is crazy. It's such a softball question.

But no, achieving financial independence and enjoying an early retirement is clearly not possible for everyone.

Why is this even a question? Do people not understand what a lot of people make in the US?  Have they not read my excellent posts on the middle class and income quintiles? Do they feel appropriately guilty for not having read them?

I have a feeling things are really going to change for a lot of people in the FIRE community when they discover the interesting and diverse group of people sometimes described as "not us".

So let's take some time today to introduce some of these new and exciting people, using the wonder of publicly available income statistics.

Monday, October 29, 2018

A Progressive Take on Regressive Taxes

Election Day is nearly here, and buried deep down on our Tempe ballot is Proposition 417, which would increase sales tax by a tenth of a percent to fund the arts in our city. Even deeper on page two of our ballot is Prop 126, which aims to prohibit levying any future sales tax on services. (Currently, our local government can only tax goods.)

I don't know if this makes me a closet conservative, but these particular taxes rile me up. Not because I hate paying taxes: a part of me kind of likes the idea that some of my money is baked into every new sidewalk and folded into every library book. And a tenth of a percent sales tax, or applying sales tax to services, isn't going to make a dent in our high-income budget.

Still, I hate these sort of tax proposals because they are regressive: they hit people with lower incomes harder than they hit people like me. They ask someone earning minimum wage to pay a bigger percentage of her income for these taxes. Which is a really fucked up way to raise the revenue you need to run a city or a state: by going after the poorest people in your community.

So let's talk about that a bit today: why local governments get so much of their revenue by taxing the citizens who can least afford it.